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RPAH Medical Centre, Suite G10, 100 Carillon Ave, Newtown NSW 2042
02 9516 0778
COLONOSCOPY

Colonoscopy

Colonoscopy is a procedure used to inspect the large bowel (colon) and is usually done in a day facility or hospital.

During a colonoscopy a thin flexible tube called a colonoscope is carefully passed into the large intestine. A small camera on the colonoscope transmits an image to a monitor, allowing close examination of the bowel and intestinal lining. A colonoscopy can detect inflamed tissue, ulcers and abnormal growths. The procedure is used to look for early signs of colorectal cancer and
can help doctors diagnose unexplained changes in bowel habits, abdominal pain, bleeding from the anus and weight loss.

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faqS

A colonoscopy (scope) is the examination of the lower gastrointestinal tract to diagnose, and in some cases, treat problems. This procedure involves passing a colonoscope – a long, thin flexible tube with a ‘video camera’ at the tip – through the rectum into the colon (large intestine, large bowel). It allows the doctor to inspect the colon and to perform specialised procedures such as taking biopsies for pathology and removal of polyps (abnormal growths which sometimes develop into cancer).

Colonoscopy can detect polyps, inflamed tissues and cancers, such as colorectal cancer. It can help doctors diagnose unexplained changes in bowel habits, abdominal pain, bleeding from the bowel and weight loss. In some individuals with a family history of colon cancer, it may be an appropriate test and may even help to prevent colon cancer.

Download the GESA Colonoscopy fact sheet for information regarding colonoscopy preparation; how it’s performed and more.